Fun With Monkeys

The monkeys of CrocoCun Zoo keeping tabs on the new expat family.

Living in the jungle comes with the occasional monkey shake down… 

These monkeys are from the CrocoCun Zoo in Puerto Morelos (Cancun area). They have been keeping tabs on us since we played in the park behind the zoo earlier in the week, and then we saw them at the zoo. The keepers have named them all, and Yessica here is the ring leader. 

I will be posting a separate bit about the zoo because it is worthy of its whole, special post!

What’s in That Diaper Bag?!

As we travel the Mexican Riviera, we have edited the diaper bag several times. “Strolling around” has a different meaning here than in the US, where the roads can be rough and banos even rougher. When day tripping with small children, my goal is to keep us safe and comfy, but also pack light so we can be flexible if plans change. Here are the essentials that are in my bag right now:

1. Extra onesie. In addition to diapers and wipes, an extra onesie is essential in case of blow-outs. I have learned over the years to use a loose fitting onesie as an extra in case months go by before it is used (it will likely still fit a growing baby). The key is to replace it once used, of course. Traveling with children takes a few extra minutes before you leave your room or rental to make sure you refill those essentials so you don’t get in a bind without them.

2. Wet wipes. This is a small, travel pack of sanitizing wipes that can be used to wipe down high chairs or tables when you go out to eat, or a dirty toilet if you forget number 3…

3. Toilet seat covers. I buy extra large, disposable toilet covers in bulk from Amazon. If they are too small, your potty training tot might rub her legs on a poopy pot (ick!).

4. First aid kit. This is essential for Mexico, where there is rocky terrain, coral reef, hard tile, and concrete everywhere. Little knees and elbows get bumped easily. We never even used a band aid on our youngest until we moved here. Now we have gone through a box in one month, along with large knee patches, medical tape, and a couple travel sized bottles of Neosporin. That’s what’s in the kit: various band aids, antiseptic spray, and a roll of medical tape (I prefer the tan, waterproof foam tape because it stretches over the knee when it moves).

5. Bug repellent. For the kids, we use a local concoction called Maya Bug Repellent, but it needs to be applied often and in large amounts. We brought several bottles of California Baby bug repellent with us, and went through them very quickly. The mosquitoes just bite right through it. We also use OFF on adult legs and feet. There are fleas and sand flies after 4pm, and they need a strong repellent as well. Don’t make the mistake of leaving for the day without your bug spray. UPDATED: As of January 2018, we are only using Picaridin bug repellents now (OFF Family and the natural concoctions did not prove to be strong enough for the mosquitoes, long term).

6. Bug bite itch cream or roller stick. Even with all that repellent, we still get bites. Don’t let a bad itch take away your fun. There are some roller types that contain menthols and ammonia, which work great for adults, but are not safe for small children. Benadryl spray or cream seems to help, and poses less danger. You’ll want to pack these in your suitcase because they are hard to find here.

7. Decoy wallet/ decoy purse. I have both. I use them for different occasions. You want to keep a low profile here so that you do not become a target for theft or extortion. I keep my nice handbags in the states, and I have a small Vera Bradley crossbody with lots of pockets to hold my wallet with one credit card (not debit), and some petty change, or a small wad of pesos for snacks, etc. Most gift shops take credit cards, and they are easier to cancel if your wallet is stolen. A debit card, we are told, can be a source for extortion, where the perpetrator will demand you take it to the atm and make a withdrawal. I just like to avoid any possible targets, especially when my children are with me.

8. An amazing toy. This week it was a lime that baby A found on the street under a tree. For whatever reason this was the most interesting item to him, just second to the ipad (which we do not like, but surely keeps the peace while on longer drives in the car). This lime ended up nearly rotting in my bag, but I found it just in time to throw away. Totally worth every penny (especially since it was free). Other great toys have been teethers with bristles, a singing elephant that speaks Spanish, and a bucket of sand toys (not able to fit those in the diaper bag, but we stow them in the back seat or stroller).

9. Finally, a lightweight cardigan in Mama’s size. Good on those slightly chilly days here during the winter, or an especially powerful air conditioning unit. It doubles as a blanket, sun shade, napkin, etc.

I mentioned diapers and wipes before. You will have no problem finding affordable baby products here in the Riviera Maya, at any grocery store and many corner stores too. The locals love babies, and are very family oriented, so you don’t need to overpack! Stop by the grocery store on your way into town. It will give you the opportunity to see the other great deals to be found here locally.

At the airport

On our extended layover before continuing onto our new homeland, I thought I would post this video from the airport. Once we got all our bags packed tight into our car, we pulled into the parking ramp at the airport and realized we had no idea how to get all those bags to the gate. In freezing, windy Minnesota weather, Brian ran into the airport and came back ten minutes later with one smart-carte, only to realize it wasn’t going to pull more than a few bags (and we had two strollers and two carseats to schlep as well). So in he went again to run across the airport and get another cart. Meanwhile, both kids went into total meltdown in the backseat. Thirty minutes and two temper tantrums later… we finally all got inside and on the correct level (taking separate elevators in the middle of airport construction resulted in some lost time as well while we relocated Brian). The rest is well, as they say, history! Our six bags turned into nine checked items (because we checked two carseats and the double stroller), and five carry-ons. The first flight was easy and fun, with extra legroom and lots of surprises for the toddler, and spiked lemonade for two worn out parents. Cheers! The journey has just begun…